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South African literature now

One can always forgive lying - lying is a delightful thing, for it leads to the truth.

Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment  (via fyodors)

(Source: greatliteraryquotations, via dostoyevsky)

aerodrome/blog: AERODROME takes off!

thisisaerodrome:

After months of preparation, AERODROME is now live! Head over to aerodrome.co.za to check it out.

AERODROME celebrates words and people. Through its reviews, interviews, extracts and original poetry, it aims to both champion and critique the art of writing — and showcase the subjects…

9 months ago - 3

My name is Solomon Levi,
the desert is my home,
my mother’s breast was thorny,
and father I had none.


The sands whispered, Be separate,
the stones taught me, Be hard.
I dance, for the joy of surviving,
on the edge of the road.

Stanley Kunitz, An Old Cracked Tune (via myimaginarybrooklyn)

movingbackward:

“ma” by Antjie Krog

movingbackward:

“ma” by Antjie Krog

(Source: rhodawave)

What is a review essay? Are there any do’s and don’ts, or is it a free for all? Hedley Twidle presents, in three parts, the best work from a graduate seminar on writing review essays which he ran in the UCT English department. This week graduate student Anneke Rautenbach writes on Dana Snyman’s searching book, The Long Way Home.

What is a review essay? Are there any do’s and don’ts, or is it a free for all? Hedley Twidle presents, in three parts, the best work from a graduate seminar on writing review essays which he ran in the UCT English department. This week graduate student Anneke Rautenbach writes on Dana Snyman’s searching book, The Long Way Home.

Historian Bill Nasson describes Karel Schoeman’s new book, Cape Lives of the Eighteenth Century, as a rich pudding from which to pick out savoury plums. Schoeman reminds us, says Nasson, of a Cape in which branding, scourging, mutilation, amputation, empalement, roasting, drowning, strangulation, breaking on a cross and shredding with red-hot pincers were all standard fare to get people into line again.

Saying it but disclaiming it

A well-known skeptic about the SA tradition of writers warmly backslapping other writers in literary reviews recently commented that if most new works of writing were getting “carrots” instead of “sticks” in public reviews, then something was definitely amiss with the “sticks” SA critics were using. Well, Rustum Kozain offers SLiPnet readers a nuanced display of how to wield the critical stick – compassionately, without sarky one-upmanship, but robustly, in his review of Erich Rautenbach’s dagga-infused novel, The Unexploded Boer.